Teaching & Learning

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Overview

  • The Troy School District offers a rigorous curriculum designed to ensure that all students are college and career ready. Our curriculum meets all national and state standards.
  • Every Troy School District building has met the stringent requirements for North Central Accreditation. We are only one of a handful of districts that hold district-wide accreditation.
  • Strong curriculum standards have led to Troy student achievement levels being among the highest at state and national levels.
  • All of our schools follow the same curriculum at each grade level.

Curriculum by Grade Level - Elementary

Kindergarten

Curriculum

Language Arts

The kindergarten language arts curriculum is designed to excite children about literacy. Each day is filled with experiences that develop expressive and receptive language. Art, media, puppetry, dramatic play, story telling, and literature sharing are the activities used to develop listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing skills.

Kindergarten children learn that print carries meaning and represents language. They engage in pre-reading activities that include learning letter names and sounds and recognizing common words. Children are introduced to beginning comprehension strategies. Writing experiences are also an important part of the kindergarten language arts curriculum.

Mathematics

Kindergarten children develop mathematical skills through "hands-on" activities and games. They become familiar with numbers 1-110 by counting by 1s, 2s, and 5s. The concepts of graphing, telling time, number patterns, fractions, and money are introduced. Children compare a variety of objects using their length, weight and volume; estimate measures; and use measurement tools. Number stories provide a way for young children to read and write numbers. Games are used as a concrete way of introducing a variety of topics, including the concepts of fairness and chance. Kindergartners will occasionally bring home Math Link "homework" assignments to explore with their family.
 

Media Center

The media center is an exciting place for kindergarteners. They listen to stories and meet characters like Cat in the Hat, Clifford the Dog, Franklin the Turtle - characters who will remain friends for life. They learn how to care for books, and how to choose a book that meets their reading interests. They check out books and practice responsible behaviors by returning them on time. Alphabet and counting books coordinate with the language arts and math curricula. Students practice listening skills and begin to identify authors and illustrators.

Science

Students learn important science concepts and develop the ability to think critically by actively constructing ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. Students are actively engaged in the process of science as they explore the natural world.

In the Wood and Paper Module students are introduced to a wide variety of woods and papers in a systematic way. They will observe the properties of these materials and discover what happens when they are subjected to a number of tests and interactions with other materials. Students learn that wood and paper can be recycled to create new forms of paper or wood that have new properties. Finally, they use what they know about the properties of these marvelous materials as they change wood and paper into a variety of products. Throughout the module, students have ample opportunities to compare different kinds of wood, different types of paper, and wood and paper. The concept of trees as natural resources is introduced.

The Animals Two by Two Module provides young students with close and personal interaction with some common land and water animals. Appropriate classroom habitats are established, and students learn to care for the animals. In four activities the animals are studied in pairs. Students observe and care for one animal over time, and then they are introduced to another animal similar to the first but with differences in structure and behavior. This process enhances opportunities for observation, communication, and comparison.

The giant sequoia is the most massive living organism on Earth. It is a tree, magnificent in dimension and awe inspiring in its longevity and durability. To stand in the company of such giants is to experience the scale of life. To a kindergartner the oak on the corner, the pines at the park, and the mulberry trees at school are giants. The Tress Module provides students with the opportunity to experience a systematic investigation of trees that will bring students to a better understanding of trees' place at school and in the community, and will provide some solid experiences on the way to understanding all plants.

Social Studies

Through the Kindergarten curriculum, "Myself and Others", children learn about the world around them, starting with their own classroom and expanding into their community, country, and world. Through a variety of classroom experiences, students begin to develop skills in history, geography, economics, and civics. Kindergarteners experience how stories, poems, and songs relate to their world. Good citizenship skills are emphasized as students learn to make good choices and help others. Students begin to explore the core democratic values.

Visual Art

The visual art curriculum for kindergarten in a full-day setting is taught by a visual art specialist. This highly structured, sequential framework has been specially designed to provide developmentally appropriate skills and knowledge while honing creativity, appreciation, historical understanding, and the ability to discuss and analyze art. In kindergarten, students will develop an awareness of two- and three-dimensional forms, manipulate art tools, be exposed to famous works of art, and learn to use a wide array of art materials. Throughout the year, student art may be displayed in individual school buildings and throughout the community.

Vocal/General Music

An elementary music specialist teaches Vocal/general music in a full-day kindergarten setting. Students learn to make and respond to music through age-appropriate songs, dances, and activities. Basic instruction includes: Exploring their singing voices and other sounds; keeping a steady beat utilizing physical movement, dances, games, and rhythm instruments; learning a variety of traditional songs; and creating cultural awareness through songs, instruments, and ethnic dances. (Students enrolled in half-day kindergarten have music taught by their classroom teacher.)
 

Health

The study of health in kindergarten is one of self-discovery and self-realization. It is an opportunity for children to explore what is valued by themselves and others and to grow socially and emotionally. The importance of the family and the interdependence of all people are identified.

Children begin to identify the individual health practices that promote good health and emotional well-being. Students identify common household products that may be unsafe or poisonous.

Physical Education

Students go to Physical Education class for 35 minutes twice a week. During these classes students are given opportunities to develop Gross Motor skills and coordination. A variety of objects used in physical education will assist students’ development of eye, hand, and foot coordination. Students will be assessed on some locomotor skills, movements and actions. Students will also develop positive characteristics and attitudes conducive to physical fitness through exercise and activities. Through organized activities and game play, students develop a sense of fair play, and cooperation with others. Fitness components consist of but are not limited to endurance, upper body strength, core strength and flexibility. Students are introduced to the T.R.O.Y Fitness Program and are tested on two parts: Jump Roping and Continuous Jog.

1st Grade

Curriculum

Language Arts

The first grade language arts curriculum incorporates students' prior knowledge and personal experiences to expand their concept about printed language. Children are given opportunities to participate in classroom discussions, read a variety of literary genres, express ideas creatively and engage in writing on a daily basis. A variety of strategies and skills are presented in order to encourage students' development of oral and written language. Vocabulary is developed through rhyming and decoding strategies, analysis of word patterns, and continuous reinforcement of high-frequency words. Comprehension is increased through listening and reading activities which include: summarizing, identifying main idea, sequencing events, reading for details, making predictions, and drawing conclusions. Children are encouraged to express their ideas in written form, utilizing the beginning steps of the writing process. Beginning mechanics of writing and language usage are introduced within the context of daily writing activities.

Mathematics

First graders experience a variety of math concepts. They use three-digit numbers for counting forward and backward, identifying larger and smaller numbers, and writing numbers from dictation. Games and activities involving number facts provide addition and subtraction practice. They expand on the skills taught in kindergarten with measuring, telling time, and reading and comparing temperatures on a thermometer. Children measure length in both inches and centimeters. Telling time on an analog clock to 5 minutes or to 1 minute will be practiced. First-grade students collect, organize, and display information using an assortment of graphs and tables. Children are actively involved in constructing and identifying 2- and 3-dimensional shapes, equivalent fractions, and a variety of patterns. These experiences are extended outside of the classroom with regular Home Link assignments.

Media Center

In first grade, students learn about parts of a book and parts of a story. They can differentiate between fiction and non-fiction, and they can explain different types of fiction such as fairy tales, folk tales, science fiction and mysteries. They explore different non-fiction subjects, and see how books with the same subject are located on the same shelf. They are introduced to the Internet and Internet safety. First graders can explain that people around the world create different stories, and they participate in storytelling and dramatizations.

Science

Students learn important science concepts and develop the ability to think critically by actively constructing ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. Students are actively engaged in the process of science as they explore the natural world.

The New Plants Module provides experiences that heighten students' awareness of the diversity of life in the plant kingdom. Students care for plants to learn what they need to grow and develop. They observe the structures of flowering plants and discover ways to propagate new plants from mature plants (from seeds, bulbs, roots, and stem cuttings). They observe and describe changes that occur as plants grow, and organize their observations on a calendar and in a journal.

The Solids and Liquids Module provides experiences that heighten students' awareness of the physical world. Matter with which we interact exists in three fundamental states: solid, liquid, and gas. In this module first graders have introductory experiences with two of these states of matter, solid and liquid.

The Pebbles, Sand, and Silt Module consists of four sequential investigations, each designed to introduce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide experiences that heighten students' awareness of rocks as earth materials and natural resources. They will come to know rocks by many names and in a variety of sizes. Pebbles and sand are the same material—just different sizes.
 

Social Studies

The first grade social studies curriculum, “My School and Family,” introduces students to their world as they explore their own school, family, neighborhood, and country. First grade students compare and contrast families and schools of today with those of the past, while discovering the important part natural resources, government, and citizenship play in their lives. Students are taught skills in history, geography, civics, economics, problem solving, and study skills, with literature being used to reinforce these social studies concepts. They learn that although their world consists of diverse peoples, we all have a lot in common. First graders continue to expand their knowledge of citizenship as they explore the core democratic values.

Visual Art

In first grade, the visual art specialist utilizes a sequential, discipline-based curriculum specially designed to expand the students' artistic creativity and knowledge base. First graders are formally introduced to the elements and principles of art, including: Color, line, form and shape, pattern and composition, space, and texture; the study of various cultures; and the awareness of famous art works. Students learn to use a variety of tools and materials in age-appropriate activities that stimulate the imagination and help develop problem-solving skills. Throughout the year, student art may be displayed in individual school buildings and throughout the community.

Vocal/General Music

The Vocal/general music program at the first-grade level is designed to expose children to the enjoyment of making and performing music while developing basic musical concepts and skills. The curriculum is organized to include many opportunities for singing, listening, playing instruments, creating, and moving to music. Emphasis is on the total involvement of students as music specialists focus on age-appropriate, hands-on musical experiences and activities. First graders are introduced to the elements of music, including melody, harmony, form, rhythm, texture, timbre, expressive qualities, and style. They explore the expressive qualities of their voices, learn beginning music reading and vocabulary, and, in simple ways, how to listen to and analyze a variety of music. Through exposure to a wide variety of musical styles, beginning attitudes and values about music are formulated. A public performance is often a highlight of a first grader's formal experience with music education.

Health

First-grade students learn to identify their feelings and to recognize that others have feelings. They identify the relationship between feelings and attitudes. Students recognize the importance of decision-making and the possible consequences of various alternatives. They look at the causes of behavior in themselves and others and identify more appropriate behaviors. Pupils in first grade become familiar with common household substances that may be harmful or poisonous. They also learn to recognize emergencies or potential emergency situations and review appropriate ways to react.

Physical Education

Students go to Physical Education class for 35 minutes twice a week. During these classes students are given opportunities to develop Gross Motor skills and coordination. A variety of objects used in physical education will assist students’ development of eye, hand, and foot coordination. Students will be assessed on some locomotor skills, movements and actions. Students will also develop positive characteristics and attitudes conducive to physical fitness through exercise and activities. Through organized activities and game play, students develop a sense of fair play, and cooperation with others. Fitness components consist of but are not limited to endurance, upper body strength, core strength and flexibility. Students are introduced to the T.R.O.Y Fitness Program and are tested on two parts: Jump Roping and Continuous Jog.

2nd Grade

Curriculum

Language Arts

The language arts curriculum in second grade continues to develop skills in vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. Children have opportunities for reading and responding in a large group, small group, or independently. Vocabulary development includes teaching phonetic and decoding skills. Children practice comprehension strategies that include: summarizing, identifying the main idea, sequencing, making predictions, and reading for specific detail and drawing conclusions. Children also learn to listen and retell stories. Children are encouraged to express their ideas in written form, utilizing the basic steps of the writing process.

Children write in a variety of curriculum areas. Beginning mechanics of writing and language usage are introduced and practiced within the context of daily writing activities.

Mathematics

Second graders focus on thinking and communicating mathematically. The children have real-life math experiences in order to practice problem solving and build a true understanding of the mathematical concepts they need. Hands-on activities and math games are used to review and learn extended addition and subtraction facts. Students spend time sharing the strategies they used to solve mental math problems. They learn that there are a variety of ways to get the same answer. Students become familiar with arrays, which serve as the foundation for multiplication and division fact families.

Money becomes a basis for many math skills in second grade. Students are expected to know the values of coins and the exchange value among U.S. coins. The calculator is used for entering and computing money amounts. Graphing, calendar skills, geometry concepts, and telling time are taught throughout the year. As with the other grade levels, parent involvement with Home Links is an important part of the program.

Media Center

Second graders practice their alphabetical order by arranging books and materials according the letters on the spine. They are introduced to dictionaries and thesauri as they begin to explore a variety of reference tools. Non-fiction books are excellent resources for second grade research for science and social studies, so these students begin to discover how to find these books on the shelves. They continue reading various genre of literature to foster their appreciation of stories, folk tales and poetry. They read and evaluate Caldecott medal winners to discover different methods of illustrating books.

Science

Students learn important science concepts and develop the ability to think critically by actively constructing ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. Students are actively engaged in the process of science as they explore the natural world.

The Air and Weather Module consists of four sequential investigations, each designed to introduce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide opportunities for young students to explore the natural world by using simple tools to observe and monitor change.

The Sound Module focuses on providing opportunities for students to explore sounds from different sources. Students will explore ways to make sounds higher or lower and louder or softer.

We live in a dynamic world where everything is in motion, or so it seems. But not everything is moving the same way. Some things move from one place to another. Other things go around and around in a rotational motion. Still other things are stationary, stable for a time, balanced on a thin line between stop and go. These are the global phenomena that students experience in this module, Balance and Motion.

The Insects Module provides experiences that heighten students' awareness of the diversity of animal forms. They come to know firsthand the life sequences of a number of insects. In each investigation an insect is introduced, and students observe structures and behaviors, discuss their findings, and ask questions. Students observe life cycles of insects and compare the stages of metamorphosis exhibited by each species.

Visual Art

In second grade the elements and principles of art are reviewed, utilized, and expanded upon as students develop their knowledge of vocabulary, art production, appreciation, and critical judgment. Through a variety of activities and artistic media, students learn to compare and contrast different art styles, differentiate between cultural art forms, and distinguish between historical periods. Second graders further demonstrate their understanding by creating quality works of art, utilizing a variety of materials and techniques to express themselves.

Social Studies

The social studies curriculum in second grade focuses on the concept of community and includes an in depth study of Troy, past and present. Through interactive experiences, students gain knowledge about their community’s history, government, economics, and geography, while learning problem solving and study skills. Students compare their own community with others around the country and world, discovering similarities and differences. Second grade students continue to explore the core democratic values.

Physical Education

Students go to Physical Education class for 35 minutes twice a week. Students continue to work with their Gross Motor skills, spatial awareness, and coordination. They will explore the principles of eye, hand, and foot coordination through a variety of activities. Students continue to develop traditional team sports based skills through culminating activities and game play.   They will be assessed in certain skills throughout the year. Students will develop positive characteristics and attitudes, a sense of fair play, teamwork concepts, and cooperation with others. At this level, there is an increased emphasis on cardiopulmonary fitness, muscular strength, flexibility and coordination through the T.R.O.Y. Fitness Program. Students are assessed twice a year in Continuous Jog, Jump Roping, Plank, Sit and Reach, and Flex-arm Hang. Every student will have a personal fitness log that they will set goals for themselves in each of the fitness tests. After every assessment, student will reevaluate their goals and set new ones.

3rd Grade

Curriculum

Language Arts

In third grade, students continue to develop strategies to effectively use language. Through the presentation of reports and journal writing, they learn to write and speak for a specific purpose. Students learn to become strategic readers by identifying the elements of a story. They read expository material for specific information. Study skills include note taking, the use of reference materials, interpreting graphs and diagrams, and test-taking skills.

Vocabulary development continues to include the refinement of phonetic and decoding skills. Word analysis strategies include: homonyms, antonyms, synonyms, analogies, multiple meaning and compound words. Students expand their vocabulary by learning strategies for identifying unfamiliar words.

Reading comprehension skills taught include: understanding fiction and nonfiction reading selections, identifying main ideas, sequencing events, recalling details, making predictions, drawing inferences, and understanding cause-and-effect relationships.

Third graders continue to learn and practice the steps of the writing process. Peer conferencing is introduced as another revision technique. Proper grammar, spelling, and the mechanics of writing are taught to enable students to proofread and communicate more effectively.

Mathematics

Third graders focus on fact families in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. They continue developing strategies for multi-digit addition and subtraction problems. Learning multiplication facts through the 10s is a goal this year. Other third-grade skills include understanding large numbers in addition to working with small numbers using equivalent fractions and decimals (to the thousandths). They continue the study of geometry, negative numbers, calculator skills, telling time, and geometry.

Practical application of measurement skills includes linear, weight, and capacity with customary and metric units. Students perform probability experiments that provide information for analyzing data and predicting outcomes. Third graders will have Home Links homework on a regular basis.

Media Center

Third grade is a busy year in the media center. Students begin to use the computer card catalog to find their books. They practice searching by author, by title and by subject. They are introduced to the Dewey Decimal System, and use their alphabet skills, their math skills and their general subject knowledge to locate books. Encyclopedia, maps and globes in the media center are important resources. Students use these for classroom research on cities, countries and other curriculum subjects. Third graders are reading chapter books and poetry. Literature appreciation continues to be important as it is a lifelong skill. In many schools, biography is an important unit for third grade as these students find a variety of materials with information about the person of their choice.

Science

Students learn important science concepts and develop the ability to think critically by actively constructing ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. Students are actively engaged in the process of science as they explore the natural world.

Measurement, the process of quantifying observations, is one of the cornerstones of science. Measurement compares nature—the unknown—to a standard unit—the known. Through such comparison, the organization of the world becomes more comprehensive. The Measurement Module consists of four investigations, each designed to emphasize a particular type of metric measurement—length, mass, temperature, and volume.

Water is the most important substance on Earth. Water dominates the surface of our planet, changes the face of the land, and defines life. These powerful, pervasive ideas are introduced here. The Water Module consists of four investigations in which students explore properties of water, changes in water, interactions between water and other earth materials, and how humans use water.

The Earth, Moon, and Sun Module is designed to introduce students to objects we see in the sky. Students compare and contrast the characteristics of the Earth, Moon, and Sun as they investigate the relative motion of each.

The Structures of Life Module consists of four sequential investigations dealing with observable characteristics of organisms. Students observe, compare, categorize, and care for a selection of organisms, and in so doing they learn to identify properties of plants and animals and to sort and group organisms on the basis of observable properties. Students investigate structures of the organisms and learn how some of the structures function in growth and survival.

Social Studies

The third grade social studies curriculum focuses on regions. Students begin by examining regional communities in Michigan and then go on to explore the five regions of the United States. Students actively participate in inquiry-based lessons that emphasize knowledge of history, geography, economics, and political science as they compare and contrast the US regions. Third graders continue to expand their knowledge of citizenship as they further explore the core democratic values.

Visual Art

The third-grade visual art curriculum continues to focus on the sequential study of the elements and principles of art, including color, line, form, shape, pattern, composition, space, and texture. Students are provided activities to stimulate their imaginations and refine as well as expand their artistic skills, visual acumen, and historic and aesthetic awareness. Students at this level can talk about and produce a high quality of art. They are able to discriminate and form artistic judgments about their art and the creative efforts of their peers.

During the year, student art may be displayed in individual school buildings and throughout the community.

Vocal/General Music

In third grade, students continue to build upon their musical knowledge-base as more complex songs, musical notation, and vocabulary are presented by the music specialist. Students actively demonstrate their awareness of the elements of music through their successful use of dynamics, tone color, melody, and harmony in the songs they sing and in the accompaniments and compositions they create. Students deepen their understanding of the world around them and hone their critical-thinking skills by tracing a song's geographic, historical and cultural roots, as well as listening to, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to a variety of songs and musical works.

Exposure to a variety of music allows students to formulate attitudes and values about music. A public performance is often an outcome of the third-grade curriculum.

Health

Students in third grade review and reinforce the decision-making steps and process in choices they make. The students are introduced to the various body systems. The major parts and functions of the skeletal and muscular systems are identified. Peer pressure in relation to smoking is discussed, and students learn to select the appropriate choice of behavior in a given situation.

Physical Education

Students go to Physical Education class twice a week, once for 25 minutes and once for 30 minutes. Students continue to work with their Gross Motor skills, spatial awareness, and coordination. They will explore the principles of eye, hand, and foot coordination through a variety of activities. Students continue to develop traditional team sports based skills through culminating activities and game play.   They will be assessed in certain skills throughout the year. Students will develop positive characteristics and attitudes, a sense of fair play, teamwork concepts, and cooperation with others. At this level, there is an increased emphasis on cardiopulmonary fitness, muscular strength, flexibility and coordination through the T.R.O.Y. Fitness Program. Students are assessed twice a year in Continuous Jog, Jump Roping, Plank, Sit and Reach, and Flex-arm Hang. Every student will have a personal fitness log that they will set goals for themselves in each of the fitness tests. After every assessment, student will reevaluate their goals and set new ones.

Spanish

Troy School District's elementary Spanish program is intended to help children achieve a positive, successful experience in their exposure to learning another language. Elementary students in grades 3 through 5 receive 45 minutes of oral instruction per week. In third grade, the children will become more comfortable with reading and writing in Spanish. The students will begin independent oral activities, and will continue mastering listening comprehension skills. Some topics of instruction include greetings, colors, numbers, family, community, animals, alphabet, calendar and breakfast foods.

4th Grade

Curriculum

Language Arts

Fourth-grade students learn additional strategies to effectively express themselves in both written and spoken language. Listening is also an important skill that students work on. Students participate in individual and group oral reports and presentations in different curricular areas. They continue to learn and practice strategies to differentiate fact and opinion, the author's viewpoint, making inferences, predicting outcomes, and summarizing.

Vocabulary development includes using context clues, word analysis, multiple-meaning words, and word analogies. Students expand their personal vocabularies through a variety of reading, writing, and listening activities. Children become more competent in understanding structure in both fiction and nonfiction text. Through the use of a variety of writing activities, students are given ample opportunities to draft, revise, proofread, and create final copies.

Mathematics

Fourth graders explore geometry concepts and apply shape properties to create geometric figures. They use several different techniques to find the perimeter and area of assorted shapes. Children in fourth grade apply their knowledge of math facts to fact extensions, such as 4 X 8 = 32 so 40 X 80 = 3200, and develop strategies for multi-digit multiplication problems. They use their knowledge of estimation, place value, and the relationship between multiplication and division to develop a division strategy.

Children are able to apply a variety of strategies for adding or subtracting multi-digit numbers and can apply them to situations involving decimal values. In the fourth grade, children use manipulatives to conduct probability experiments and to explore equivalent decimals and percents. Homework pages are now called Math Links.

Fourth-grade students experience a yearlong project, the World Tour. They "travel" to Washington, D.C. from Troy and then "visit" five other regions of the world. Math skills include reading tables for information, collecting numerical data, using map scales to estimate distance, locating points on a grid, and using latitude and longitude for locations on Earth. Children are also involved in performing experiments and conducting surveys where they have the opportunity to collect and organize data, display the information, and analyze and interpret the results.

Media Center

Fourth graders expand their research skills adding more sophisticated encyclopedias, electronic resources, online databases, atlases and almanacs. They evaluate the resources to decide which are best for answering specific types of questions. In fourth grade, students begin to use selected sites on the Internet to find curriculum related information. This also allows them to practice their Internet safety lessons. Technology is an important component of fourth grade media as these students can create multimedia projects that integrate media skills with curriculum studies. Literature and reading are also important as students refine their skill in selecting books for enjoyment reading.

Social Studies

Fourth grade students take part in an in-depth study of Michigan’s geography, history, economics, and government. Students are given the opportunity to discover differences and similarities between Michigan and other states. Students use knowledge of core democratic values to take a stand on current public policy issues.

Visual Art

In fourth grade, students employ the artistic elements and principles as their creativity, knowledge-base, interest, and enthusiasm for art are nurtured by an elementary visual art specialist. Based on the study of various cultures, historical periods, and famous works of art, the sequential curriculum focuses on challenging the students' problem-solving abilities.

Students are taught to manipulate an increasing variety of tools and materials and to utilize more complex artistic techniques. Throughout the year, student art may be displayed in individual school buildings and the community.

Science

Students learn important science concepts and develop the ability to think critically by actively constructing ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. Students are actively engaged in the process of science as they explore the natural world.

The Earth Materials Module consists of four sequential investigations dealing with observable characteristics of solid materials from the earth—rocks and minerals. The focus is on taking materials apart to find what they are made of and putting materials together to better understand their properties. The module introduces fundamental concepts in earth science and takes advantage of the students' intrinsic interest in the subject matter and in the physical world around them.

The Magnetism and Electricity Module consists of five sequential investigations, each designed to introduce or reinforce concepts in physical science. The investigations provide opportunities for students to explore the natural and human-made worlds by observing and manipulating materials in focused settings using simple tools.

Chemistry is the study of the structure of matter and the changes or transformations that take place in it. Learning about the makeup of substances gives us knowledge about how things go together and how they can be taken apart. Learning about changes in substances is important for several reasons: changes can be controlled to produce new materials; changes can be used to give off energy to run machines. The Mixtures and Solutions Module has four investigations that introduce students to these fundamental ideas in chemistry.

All living things depend on the conditions in their environment. The study of the relationships between one organism and its environment builds knowledge of all organisms. With this knowledge comes an awareness of limits. Changes in an environment can be hard on organisms. Such knowledge is important because humans can change environments. To do so without awareness of possible consequences can lead to disasters. The Environments Module consists of six investigations that introduce students to these basic concepts in environmental biology.

Vocal/General Music

In fourth-grade Vocal/general music, students continue to build upon their past information-base as they refine their understanding of musical elements and concepts. Musical literacy is stressed as students learn to read and sing standard musical notation, to analyze, move to, and to create more complex songs.

A strong correlation is made among the songs, instruments, and ethnic dances and their geographic, historical and cultural roots.

Health

In fourth grade, students become aware that the outcome of situations depends on the choices they make. Students recognize how health products can be used or misused and learn some common reasons for drug misuse. They learn how smoking and alcohol affect the body.

The students continue to study the human body and how it is composed of cells, organs, and tissues. Students gain an understanding of the structure and functions of the heart, circulatory system, respiratory system, and digestive system.

Physical Education

Students go to Physical Education class twice a week, once for 25 minutes and once for 30 minutes. Students continue to work and fine tune Gross-Motor skills, spatial awareness, and coordination. They increase their ability with the principles of eye, hand, and foot coordination through a variety of activities. Students continue to develop traditional team sports based skills through culminating activities and game play. They will be assessed in certain skills throughout the year. Students will develop positive characteristics and attitudes, a sense of fair play, teamwork concepts, and cooperation with others. At this level, there is an increased emphasis on cardiopulmonary fitness, muscular strength, flexibility and coordination through the T.R.O.Y. Fitness Program. Students are assessed twice a year in Continuous Jog, Jump Roping, Plank, Sit and Reach, and Flex-arm Hang. Every student will have a personal fitness log that they will set goals for themselves in each of the fitness tests. After every assessment, student will reevaluate their goals and set new ones.

Spanish

Troy School District's elementary Spanish program is intended to help children achieve a positive, successful experience in their exposure to learning another language. Elementary students in grades 3 through 5 receive 45 minutes of oral instruction per week. In fourth grade, the children will continue reading and writing in Spanish. The students will engage in independent oral activities as they focus on listening comprehension skills, which are a vital part of language learning. Some topics of instruction include greetings, colors, numbers, family, community, animals, alphabet, calendar, lunch foods, and adjectives.

5th Grade

Curriculum

Language Arts

Fifth grade students continue to develop and refine their language arts skills in reading, writing, thinking, speaking, listening, and viewing. Students demonstrate learning through a variety of methods. They work individually, in small and in large groups to produce oral/written reports, dramatizations, debates, and demonstrations. Students learn new vocabulary and apply it in reading, speaking, listening, and writing activities.

At this grade level, students understand new words through their study of context clues; root words, prefixes and suffixes; and synonyms and antonyms. Children develop comprehension by listening and reading for specific information. Identification of main ideas, sequencing of events, recalling details, making predictions, drawing inferences, comparing and contrasting, and understanding cause-and-effect relationships are emphasized.

Fifth graders also examine the story structure of different genres, analyze the author's viewpoint, and identify topic sentences, main ideas and supporting details. Activities are also used to stimulate ideas for focusing and organizing student writing across all curriculum areas. Emphasis is placed on using a variety of sentence patterns, developing clarity, individual style, and refining paragraph skills. Children experience a variety of writing activities such as reports, journals, learning logs, persuasive writing, and poetry. They also refine their proofreading skills to produce a quality document.

Mathematics

In fifth grade, students continue to investigate naming numbers in a variety of ways, including factors, exponents, fractions, decimals. They continue to practice with the division algorithm and apply their strategies for whole-number computation to decimals.

Fractions are used in measurement, equivalent forms, ratios, and addition and subtraction situations. Decimal and percent concepts are extended to equivalent forms, number lines, grids, probability, and circle graphs. Fifth graders use manipulatives to explore negative numbers and simple algebraic expressions and problems. They link their measurement and algebra skills by using formulas to find perimeters, areas, and volumes of shapes and solids. They continue their study of geometry, working with angles, 2-D and 3-D figures, and corresponding math tools.

Fifth graders participate in a yearlong American Tour. They examine changes in population, societal trends, demographics, and geography of the United States from its beginnings to the present. This integrated project allows students to use mathematics as a tool in a variety of applications. As with the other grade levels, parent involvement with Math Links is an important part of the program.

Media Center

By fifth grade, students can identify different literary genre such as historical fiction, science fiction, sports stories and mysteries. They are encouraged to read to enhance skills, such as vocabulary, context clues, sequence of events and prediction, which they are learning in language arts classes. Fifth graders use both print and electronic resources as they develop their research skills in conjunction with language arts, social studies and science projects. Treasure hunts and Internet activities teach them to apply skills they will use on their MEAP tests. They learn to evaluate web sites and print resources in order to prepare for independent use of the media center in middle school and beyond.

Science

Students learn important science concepts and develop the ability to think critically by actively constructing ideas through their own inquiries, investigations, and analyses. Students are actively engaged in the process of science as they explore the natural world.

Some of the most important scientific concepts students learn are the result of their ability to see relationships between objects and events. Relationships always involve interactions, dependencies, and cause and effect. The Variables Module has four investigations that help students discover relationships through controlled experimentation. Students will fling, float, fly, and flip objects as they discover relationships in each investigation.

In the You and Your Body Module, students will examine the skeletal system and replicate the arm’s muscle coordination and measure reaction time. They model the pumping of the heart, calculate lung capacity, and investigate respiration. They find out why we have different types of teeth and how to keep them healthy. Students discover how the five senses work to perceive and evaluate incoming information. Finally, because the body runs on fuel, students test foods for nutrient content and practice reading nutrition labels.

The Earth Processes Module provides an opportunity for students to explore the ongoing forces inside Earth and on Earth’s surface that have been shaping our planet for hundreds of millions of years. Continental drift and plate tectonics are the central themes for this unit as students investigate the rock cycle, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions.

In the Newton’s Toy Box Module, students experiment freely with familiar toys and objects. As they explain their observations, they prove Newton’s three laws of motion. The path of a tossed ball, the flip of a grasshopper toy, and the endless swing of clackers reinforce the concepts of inertia, gravity, acceleration, mass, force, and momentum. Students engage in races, games, and challenges that emphasize the laws of motion which govern everyday tasks.

Social Studies

Students in fifth grade study the historical development of the United States, from the settlement by native peoples through colonization and, later, the American Revolution. They focus on the major events and people that have impacted our country's development. Fifth graders are introduced to ways in which business and industry have affected the economy over the years. Through interactive lessons, geography, problem solving, and study skills are expanded. Students also increase analytical skills by taking a position on an issue, and writing persuasive arguments on topics of social relevance. Fifth grade students further their knowledge and understanding of core democratic values upon which our government is based.
 

Instrumental Music

Elementary instrumental music is introduced at the fifth-grade level during the regular school day. This specialized music program focuses on the development of fundamental skills and concepts of playing a wind, percussion, or string instrument. Students learn instrument care, playing position, tone quality, music literacy, and vocabulary as they address the challenges of performing in a group ensemble. Stressed are concepts that will encourage students to play with confidence, enthusiasm, and enjoyment all the while fostering a sense of creativity, self- discipline, and personal achievement.

All students, in consultation with an instrumental music specialist, are given the opportunity to participate in either the elementary orchestra or band program. Instruments offered in the orchestra program include: Violin, viola, cello or string bass. Band instruments offered include: Flute, trombone, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, french horn, baritone or percussion.

Health

Fifth-grade students identify the physical and personal characteristics that make them unique, worthwhile, and valuable. Students study the nervous and reproductive systems while focusing attention on the physical and emotional changes that occur during adolescence. They develop an awareness of the use and effects of drugs. They study how alcohol and tobacco affect the human body.

Visual Art

The visual art curriculum culminates at the fifth-grade level as students demonstrate their prior knowledge of the elements and principles of art; vocabulary; and cultural, historic, and aesthetic awareness through a variety of meaningful, artistic experiences. Fifth graders have the opportunity to respond visually, verbally, analytically, and creatively through the skillful handling of a wide variety of art media.

Throughout the year, student art may be displayed in individual school buildings and the community.

Physical Education

Students go to Physical Education class twice a week, once for 25 minutes and once for 30 minutes. Students continue to work and fine tune Gross-Motor skills, spatial awareness, and coordination. They increase their ability with the principles of eye, hand, and foot coordination through a variety of activities. Students continue to develop traditional team sports based skills through culminating activities and game play. They will be assessed in certain skills throughout the year. Students will develop positive characteristics and attitudes, a sense of fair play, teamwork concepts, and cooperation with others. At this level, there is an increased emphasis on cardiopulmonary fitness, muscular strength, flexibility and coordination through the T.R.O.Y. Fitness Program. Students are assessed twice a year in Continuous Jog, Jump Roping, Plank, Sit and Reach, and Flex-arm Hang. Every student will have a personal fitness log that they will set goals for themselves in each of the fitness tests. After every assessment, student will reevaluate their goals and set new ones.

Spanish

Troy School District's elementary Spanish program is intended to help children achieve a positive, successful experience in their exposure to learning another language. Elementary students in grades 3 through 5 receive 45 minutes of oral instruction per week. In fifth grade, the children will continue reading and writing in Spanish. The students will engage in independent oral activities as they focus on listening comprehension skills, which are a vital part of language learning. Some topics of instruction include greetings, colors, numbers, family, community, animals, alphabet, calendar, lunch foods, and adjectives.

Math Placement

Curriculum by Grade Level - Secondary

Middle School

Download the entire middle school curriculum guide below.

If you have any questions regarding this material, please contact our Director of Student Growth, Equity, and Accountability, Jennifer Gottlieb.

High School

The Troy School District high school course catalog is now available online through Career Cruising’s Course Planner at https://www.careercruising.com/home/DirectoryURL.aspx/troy

On the bottom left corner of the Portfolio login page, you can access the Student Course Guide for Athens High School and Troy High School. You do not need an account to view the course offerings. Use the drop-down menu to select the school.

This link will provide instructions on how to use Course Planner to select your courses for next year: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMOZiEVYEN0

High School Graduation Requirements for the Class of 2015

For more information on the courses offered at Oakland Schools Technical Campus, see the - OSTC Program Catalog for Fall 2011-2012.

Student athletes who wish to participate in sports at the college level must meet NCAA eligibility standards. Please go to http://www.ncaa.org/ for more information.

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Secondary Math Test-Out Materials

Middle and High School students may waive a mathematics course requirement by testing out of a particular course. The documents below explain the process and contain study guides for each course. Please read the first document (Forms for testing out 2019) thoroughly for the requirements for testing out. 

IMPORTANT: The test out form must be returned to your current building principal by March 20, 2019.

Math Test Date: April 27, 2019 (Saturday) 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM Troy High School Gymnasium.

TSD Digital Learning Environment - 1:1

Additional Resources

Videos

Project R.O.O.T

Bemis students use their learning to change the world! 

5th and 1st grade students at Bemis Elementary School pondered the question, "What can we do to help people who don't have access to healthy food?" Their teachers, Elliott Kern and Morgan Fields, guided their inquiry, with a seamless integration of multiple curricular areas--reading, writing, math, science. The result is student driven endeavor that they believe will have an impact across the globe!